Sponsored Links Shocking footage reveals the moment a scientist lets a six-foot PYTHON bite him – leaving him with a gaping wound and in need of stitches

  • Adam Thorn, from Australia, screamed in pain in video for History Channel 
  • In clip, he is joined by animal handler Rob Alleva in a series called ‘Kings of Pain’ 
  • The pair are bitten and stung by some of the most deadly animals in the world 

Adam, who is seen wearing a face mask and a groin covering, yelps as the serpent bites him before his co-host Rob Alleva pulls the animal away

Co-star Rob, who pulled the snake away from Adam’s arm, was also bitten, and needed two blood clots squeezed out of his arm.

The daredevil show follows Adam Thorn, a wildlife biologist, and Rob ‘Caveman’ Alleva, a professional animal handler, as they traverse the world and get bitten by dangerous animals and insects.

VIDEO TO WATCH

The pair have developed a 30-point pain scale to measure the intensity, duration and damage of the bites in order to instruct viewers which animals to avoid.

The daring duo are following in the footsteps of Dr. Justin Schmidt – an insect scientist who developed a sting pain index for bugs in the 1980s.

The pair were filming a new unscripted series for the History Channel called ‘Kings of Pain’ which left Adam with a gaping wound and needing stitches after one of the snakes fangs was left lodged in his flesh.

Co-star Rob, who pulled the snake away from Adam’s arm, was also bitten, and needed two blood clots squeezed out of his arm

While reticulated pythons are nonvenomous, they have been known to kill people due to their ability to constrict.

Other animals used on the show include a wasp known as a ‘tarantula hawk, a Nile monitor lizard, giant Asian centipede, fire urchin, lion fish, piranha and a lion-fish.

Due to their docile nature, pythons are one of the most popular snake breeds to be kept as pets. However, attacks on their handlers are not uncommon.

A python had never been known to have killed a person in Britain until the death of Dan Brandon was confirmed, but there have been previous fatalities across the world.

The daredevil show follows Adam Thorn, a wildlife biologist, and Rob ‘Caveman’ Alleva, a professional animal handler as they travel the world and get bitten by dangerous animals and insects. Pictured, the Python snake being set up for the attack during the horrifying footage

The pair have developed a 30-point pain scale to measure the intensity, duration and damage of the bites in order to inform viewers which animals to avoid and why.

While reticulated pythons are non-venomous, they have been known to kill people because of their ability to constrict

Pictured, the aftermath

Pythons are found in sub-Saharan African countries and in many parts of Asia.

They are non-venomous snakes and kill by constriction, latching on with their teeth and coiling around their prey.

Burmese pythons can grow up to 23ft with other species, like the ball python growing just to around 6ft.

Due to their docile natures, python snakes are one of the most popular snake breeds to be kept as pets. However, attacks on their handlers are not uncommon.

A python had never been known to have killed a person in Britain until the death of Dan Brandon was confirmed, but there have been previous fatalities across the world.

A man was killed by a python in Indonesia recently, while two boys died in Canada after one escaped from a pet shop in 2013.

Noah Barthe, four, and his brother Connor, six, were at a sleepover at Jean-Claude Savoie’s flat above the shop, called Reptile Ocean, in August 2013.

The African rock python got out through a ventilation duct in Campbellton, New Brunswick, and dropped into the living room where the two boys were sleeping.

It strangled and bit them both to death and sparked a court trial, however the owner was cleared of responsibility.

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Henry Sapiecha

 

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