Six-metre python skin discovered in a nursery roof space – as its owner admits she put the slithering beast there decades ago to ‘take care of the rats’

  • A monstrous six-metre python was discovered to be living in the roof of a home
  • A pest controller removed the skin it had shed from a hole in the spare bedroom
  • Homeowner Yvonne Cunningham admitted she put the snake in there herself
  • She says using snakes to deal with unwanted vermin is a ‘classic bushy trick’
  • The snake, named Monty, has since started a family in the roof of the home 

The reptile was last pictured in 2015 slithering along the gutter of the steel roof in Innisfail, south of Cairns

A monstrous python has been quietly living in the ceiling of a suburban home in far North Queensland for more than 40 years as a bizarre form of pest control.

The six metre snake, nicknamed Monty, was placed there by property owner Yvonne Cunningham in the 1970s to deal with a severe rat infestation.

The reptile was last pictured in 2015 slithering along the gutter of the steel roof in Innisfail, south of Cairns.

A pest controller who visited the property recently received the fright of his life after coming across a six metre long snake skin.

Ms Cunningham, who now owns the Violet and Lace Nursery in Innisfail, wasn’t daunted at the find.

A monstrous six-metre python was discovered to be living in the roof of a home after a pest controller removed the skin it had shed from a hole in the spare bedroom

She first noticed the snake in her chicken coop four decades ago and thought it’d be a perfect opportunity to fix an ever-growing rat infestation in her roof.

Coming from a small country town, she had no qualms about opening her property to the slithering serpent.

‘I’m a bushy from way back, and I knew that for problems with rats, what every bushy would do is find a carpet snake and put it in the ceiling,’ she told NewsCorp.

Amalgamated Pest Control owner Scott Davis said he got a nasty shock when he came across the skin while crawling through Ms Cunningham’s roof

Monty even managed to find himself a lady friend named Monica about 30 years ago.

Ms Cunningham said the pair had mated, with the offspring making their way through the property.

The snakes reportedly don’t bother her and don’t come in the house, aside from a spare bedroom that has a cavity in the wall, which has been since dubbed the snakes own nursery.

Monica is often found on top of a shelf in the room coiled around her eggs.

While Ms Cunningham was happy to let Monty and his brood take up residence in her roof, her husband was less convinced.

‘He thought St Peter didn’t do a good enough job and should have gone offshore to get rid of all the snakes in the world,’ she said.

But she says in the 40 years since Monty was put to work, they’ve never had another rat infestation.

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Henry Sapiecha

 

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