Category Archives: Australia

Snakes of the Cairns region North Queensland Australia

Snakes of the Cairns region

  • Front-fanged venomous snakes (Family Elapidae)
  • Pythons: non-venomous constrictors (family Boidae)
  • File snakes (Family Acrochordidae)
  • Non-venomous and rear-fanged venomous snakes (Family Colubridae)
  • Blind snakes (Family Typhlopidae)
  • Legless lizards (Family Pygopodidae)

There can be great variation in appearance between individual snakes of the same species. The descriptions below are based on general characteristics. It can be difficult to positively identify some snakes. Never approach snakes and never assume that they are non-venomous.

LIST OF SNAKES NEXT

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Six-metre python skin discovered in a nursery roof space – as its owner admits she put the slithering beast there decades ago to ‘take care of the rats’

  • A monstrous six-metre python was discovered to be living in the roof of a home
  • A pest controller removed the skin it had shed from a hole in the spare bedroom
  • Homeowner Yvonne Cunningham admitted she put the snake in there herself
  • She says using snakes to deal with unwanted vermin is a ‘classic bushy trick’
  • The snake, named Monty, has since started a family in the roof of the home 

The reptile was last pictured in 2015 slithering along the gutter of the steel roof in Innisfail, south of Cairns

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Sponsored Links Shocking footage reveals the moment a scientist lets a six-foot PYTHON bite him – leaving him with a gaping wound and in need of stitches

  • Adam Thorn, from Australia, screamed in pain in video for History Channel 
  • In clip, he is joined by animal handler Rob Alleva in a series called ‘Kings of Pain’ 
  • The pair are bitten and stung by some of the most deadly animals in the world 

Adam, who is seen wearing a face mask and a groin covering, yelps as the serpent bites him before his co-host Rob Alleva pulls the animal away

Co-star Rob, who pulled the snake away from Adam’s arm, was also bitten, and needed two blood clots squeezed out of his arm.

The daredevil show follows Adam Thorn, a wildlife biologist, and Rob ‘Caveman’ Alleva, a professional animal handler, as they traverse the world and get bitten by dangerous animals and insects.

VIDEO TO WATCH

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Woman Pecked to Death by Her own Rooster. Murder most fowl.

An Australia  woman who was attacked by a rooster died after the bird’s pecking caused her leg to hemorrhage profusely, according to a new report of the case.

Fowl Murder in Heinous Henhouse-Rooster Apprehended & charged.Guilty & Will fry in the electric chair judge says.

The 76-year-old woman was collecting chicken eggs on her rural property when an aggressive roster began pecking at her lower-left leg, according to the report, published Aug. 20 in the journal Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology. The pecking lead to a “significant hemorrhage,” which caused the woman to collapse, the report said.

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Flock of over 50 native Australian birds die after falling from sky bleeding from eyes

WARNING: Graphic

Dozens of native corella birds have died overnight after they fell from the sky in an Adelaide outer suburb. Australia

Bleeding from their eyes and beaks, more than 50 gravely ill birds began falling from the sky at a soccer oval in One Tree Hill, a suburb on the outskirts of Adelaide, about 2.30pm yesterday.

Volunteer Sarah King said 58 birds were found dead at an Adelaide oval.

Volunteers from Casper’s Bird Rescue, founded by Sarah King, desperately tried to help the long-billed corellas, running to the oval and calling out for extra help on Facebook.

Ms King originally received a tip the birds had been shot, but vets working on the birds suspect they may have been poisoned.

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Kangaroo deliberately drowns family dog in Queensland farm dam

KANGAROOS are known for their fighting skills but one Queensland family knows all too well the calculation behind some of their moves.

The Bulmer family from Kywong Station, south of Julia Creek in mid-northern Queensland, lost their beloved dog Banjo last week after it was believed to have been drowned by a kangaroo.

Banjo, a Rhodesian ridgeback-cross, and their other dog, a foxy called Pepe, chased the kangaroo. It led them to a dam where it is believed to have waited in waist-deep water for Banjo to swim to before grabbing the dog and holding him under water until Banjo drowned.

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AUSTRALIAN Python devours live pet Christmas feast at expense of pet owner

FOR many residents, a family feast is a Christmas tradition that leaves everyone feeling the effects for days after.

However, residents weren’t the only ones nursing their full bellies this Christmas, as the Darling Downs Snake Catchers removed a 3-metre-long python who had enjoyed its very own festive feast from a Mount Lofty Toowoomba Qld home.

Snake catcher Gunter Glaser said the owner had been out to check on her pet chickens when she made the discovery.

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UBER PYTHON PIGGY BACK RIDE BY TOADS IN AUSTRALIA

A quintessentially Australian photo which could only have come from WA’s Kimberley has gone viral, as social media across the world marvelled at a python playing pick-up to a bunch of amorous cane toads.

Helicopter pilot Paul Mock snapped the photo of the olive python — named Monty, of course — onboard was a contingent of cane toads on its back in the wake of an inundation of 68mm rain at his Kununurra WA property on Monday.

Mr Mock doesn’t have social media but decided to send the picture on to his brother Andrew, who quickly uploaded it to Twitter where it caused a storm.

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Brown snake and family dog caught on security cam in fight at Truro home North of Adelaide South Australia

A FIGHT between a brown snake and a Japanese hunting dog has played out in front of a security camera at a home north of Adelaide.

Nine-year-old Chardy, a shiba inu, grabbed the metre-long brown snake as it entered Teresa and Aaron Barnden’s front yard at Truro, last week.

For more than two minutes, dog and snake joust and strike, with both appearing to land blows.

Chardy keeps pulling the snake back to the lawn, immediately in front of a security camera in a nearby window of the house.

A brown snake rears and lunges at Chardy the shiba inu in a Barossa Valley South Australia yard. Picture: Storyful

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University of Queensland team discovers new bandy-bandy snake at Weipa in the north of the continent

SCIENTISTS searching for sea snakes never expected to stumble across this find.

In a chance discovery, a team of biologists were returning from a sea snake research mission when they found a new venomous snake species for Australia.

The team, led The University of Queensland’s Associate Professor Bryan Fry, uncovered a new species of bandy-bandy snake at Weipa on the west coast of the Cape York Peninsula in the far north of the country.

Prof Fry said bandy-bandies were burrowing snakes so they were surprised they when found it on a concrete block near the sea edge, after coming in from a night of sea snake spotting.

“We later determined that the snake had slithered over from a pile of bauxite rubble waiting to be loaded onto a ship,” he said.

“On examination by my student Chantelle Derez, the bandy-bandy turned out to be a new species, visually and genetically distinct from those found on the Australian East coast and parts of the interior.”

The team found another specimen in its natural habitat near Weipa, and yet another killed by a car close to the mine.

Two more of the snakes were found in museum collections and a photo was found of another, contributing to a total of six observations in the same small region.

But Prof Fry said he feared the new species could already be in trouble and in danger of extinction due to mining.

“Bauxite mining is a major economic activity in the area, and it may be reshaping the environment to the detriment of our native plants and animals,” he said.

“The importance of such discoveries goes beyond simply documenting what is out there, as venoms are rich sources of compounds that can be used to develop new medications.

“Every species is precious and we need to protect them all, since we can’t predict where the next wonder-drug will originate from.

“The discovery of this enigmatic little snake is symptomatic of the much more fundamental problem of how little we know about our biodiversity and how much may be lost forever before we even discover it.”

Associate Professor Bryan Fry looking for snakes near Weipa, Queensland.

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Henry Sapiecha