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Watch out for these Worlds Most Deadliest 41 Venomous Dangerous Snakes on Earth.

Adding more here to our data base of the worlds most dangerous snakes. No particular order. Just enjoy the scarey journey.Presented to you by Henry Sapiecha of the www.pythonjungle.com site + 100 other sites that I have enjoyed developing & sharing with you all.

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1…Caspian Cobra


The Caspian cobra is found in central Asia. This snake is known for being very aggressive and bad-tempered. They tend to avoid humans, but will become aggressive towards them if they feel threatened. When feeling threatened it will spread its hood, hiss, and sway side-to-side, then finally strike its target multiple times. Once bitten a person may experience drowsiness, weakness, paralysis of the limbs. If untreated, the bite can result in death from respiratory failure

2…Monocled Cobra

The Monocled Cobra is widespread across south and southeast Asia. The monocled cobra was given its name due to its O-shaped, or monocellate hood pattern. These cobras prefer habitats with water such as paddy fields or swamps. However, they can adapt easily and can also be found in grasslands and forests. This cobra causes the most fatalities from snake venom poisoning in Thailand. In severe cases of envenomation death can occur within 60 minutes.

3…Jameson’s Green Mamba

The Jameson’s Green Mamba is very similar to its counterparts, the Eastern and Western Green Mamba. The Jameson’s Green Mamba can grow up to 8 feet and 8 inches (2.64 meters) long, with a dull green color across the back that blends into a pale green. It’s scales are normally edged with black. They inhabit parts of Africa and prefer landscapes such as primary and secondary rainforests, woodland, and forest-savanna. However, they are highly adaptable and can be found many times in urban areas. Their venom is highly neurotoxic and death can occur between 30-120 minutes.

4 …Rhinoceros Viper

The Rhinoceros viper is very similar to the Gaboon Viper, but has a less dangerous bite. They are slow moving, but are capable of striking quickly and it all directions, without warning. If they feel threatened, they will hiss. Its hiss is said to be the loudest out of all the African snakes, and it sounds more like a shriek. Their venom contains a neurotoxin and hemotoxin which attacks the circulatory system of its victims.

5…Chinese Cobra

The Chinese Cobra is one of the most venomous members of the cobra family. It is mainly found in mainland China and Taiwan, and has caused the most snakebites in those areas. The Chinese Cobra is always aware of its surroundings and is seldom cornered. However, if it feels threatened it will raise its forebody and spread its hood, ready to strike. Local symptoms of a bite include pain, insensibility and necrosis. Necrosis, even after treatment, may persist for many years within the victim.

5…Coastal Taipan

If untreated, a Coastal Taipan bite is 100% fatal. You do not need to worry, unless you are in the northern and eastern regions of Australia or in New Guinea. Coastal Taipans are the longest venomous snake in Australia and can grow up to 6.6 feet (2 meters) long. The Coastal Taipan’s venom consists of a highly potent neurotoxin that affects the nervous system and the blood’s ability to clot. Death can occur in as little as 30 minutes after a bite.

6…Red-Bellied Black Snake

The red-bellied black snake is found in parts of eastern Australia. It inhabits woodlands, forests and swamplands. It is also common to find them in urban areas. The snake is glossy black on the dorsal surface and red, crimson or pink in color on the lower sides and belly. This snake is normally not aggressive. However, if it feels threatened, it will recoil into a striking stance. Bites from these snakes are not normally fatal, but you should still seek medical attention.

7…Mali Cobra

The Mali cobra is a species of venomous spitting cobra that is found in Western Africa. The cobra ranges from Senegal to Cameroon, with reports to also be found from Gambia, Burkina Faso, southern Mali, and a few other countries. It inhabits both tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and shrublands. Its venom contains postsynaptic neurotoxins, cardiotoxins, and cytotoxic activity. The Mali cobra is responsible for the most snake bites in Senegal.

8…Sea Snake


Sea Snake’s venom is more toxic than its land-dwelling counterparts. However, sea snakes will only attack when provoked. However, the danger of a sea snake should not be underestimated. Most people that have been bitten work on trawlers, in the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific, as snakes are sometimes hauled in with the catch. Only a small proportion of bites have been fatal. Symptoms, such as muscles aches, spasms will most likely occur  30 minutes after the bite. If not treated one can suffer from more severe symptoms such as blurred vision and respiratory paralysis.

9…Egyptian Cobra

The Egyptian Cobra is one of the largest cobra species in Africa. It has many similar physical traits to other cobras, like a hood. However, what makes it distinct is its coloring and often a tear-drop mark near the eye. This cobra has very large fangs which allows it to deliver large quantities of venom. A bite should be considered a medical emergency as its venom affects the nervous system which eventually leads to respiratory failure

10…King Brown Snake

The King Brown Snake is the second longest species of venomous snakes in Australia. They can grow up to 9.8 feet (3 meters) long. Their venom is relatively weak compared to other species. However, what they lack in quality, they make up for in quantity. These snakes will deliver large amounts of venom when they bite. The average snakes deliver 180 milligrams during a bite. The king brown delivers close to 600 milligrams. The untreated mortality rate is 30-40%.

11…Dugite


The dugite is a venomous snake found in western Australia. Dugites are normally shy and will slither away upon seen a human. However, like many other snakes will attack if they feel cornered. Dugites are considered highly dangerous due to their very potent venom that causes both coagulopathic and procoagulant effects. Although they rarely bite humans, when they do, it is normally during when they are most active in their mating season (October and November)

12…Gaboon Viper

The Gaboon viper lives in the rainforests and savannas of sub-Saharan Africa. It is the worlds heaviest viperid and has the longest fangs of 5 centimeters (2 inches). It is normally slow moving and placid, and they are known for lying in wait for hours for their prey to pass by. Due to their docile nature, bites normally only occur when they are stepped on. However, it should be considered a medical emergency when a bite does occur.

13…Black-Necked Spitting Cobra


Keep your distance from this snake, as the black-necked spitting cobra can eject venom from its fangs over 7 meters (23 feet) with perfect accuracy. They are mainly found in just sub-Saharan Africa and can grow up to 2.2 meters (7.2 feet) long. Bites can lead to blisters, inflammation and permanent blindness if venom makes contact with the eyes.

14…Sharp-Nosed Pit Viper

The Sharp-nosed pit viper is found in southeast Asia. Its highly potent venom contains hemotoxin that is very likely to lead to hemorrhaging. Its nickname is the “hundred pacer.” It has been believed that victims will only be able to walk 100 steps before dying. However, there is an antivenin made in Taiwan. Symptoms from a bite include swelling, blistering, necrosis, and ulceration

15…Cape Cobra

The Cape Cobra is considered one of the most dangerous snakes in Africa due to its highly potent venom and its common occurrences around houses. The mortality rate for bites from a cape cobra are unknown, but are believed to be high. If a victim does not receive the antivenin it is likely he or she will die from respiratory failure.

16…South American Bushmaster

The longest snakes in the western hemisphere are the South American Bushmasters. In addition, they are the longest pit-viper in the world. They inhabit parts of South America and tend to dwell in equatorial forests. The primarily feed on mice and rats, but will attack when provoked. Unfortunately, not much is known about their venom as they are highly susceptible from stress. Therefore, they die quickly when in captivity.

17…Jararaca


The jararaca is a species of pit-viper found in souther Brazil, Paraguay, and northern Argentina. The snake prefers to live in open areas, such as farmland. Its venom is considered very toxic and causes symptoms such as bruising and blistering of the affected limb and spontaneous systemic bleeding of the gums and into the skin. However, one good thing was derived from the venom, the ACE inhibitor, which is used to treat hypertension and some types of congestive heart failure.

18…Forest Cobra


The forest cobra is native to Africa, mainly dwelling in the central and western parts of the continent. Its preferred habitat in the lowland forest and moist savannah. However, it can be found in drier climates and is a very good swimmer. Although bites to humans are rare, they are very dangerous when they occur. This snake injects a large amount of venom into its victims. Death can occur 30-120 minutes after being bitten.

19…Western Green Mamba

The western green mamba, as you would suspect, resides in west Africa. However, bites to people from this snake are very uncommon. However, when people are bitten the mortality rate is extremely high. Once bitten there is a rapid progression of life-threatening symptoms including suffocation resulting from paralysis of the respiratory muscles. Death has been also been reported to occur within 30 minutes of the bite.

20…Eastern Green Mamba

The eastern green mamba resides in East Africa and is normally found dwelling in trees. This highly venomous snake can grown up to 2 meters (6.6 feet) in length. This species has bitten many humans, many of which have resulted in fatalities. There was one case where someone died in as little as 30 minutes after the bite. Other symptoms of the venom include difficulty breathing, convulsions and nausea.

21…Common Death Adder


The common death adder is native to Australia. Not only is it one of the most venomous snakes in Australia, but also the whole world. The death adder is a master of camouflage and likes to hide beneath loose leaves in woodlands and grasslands. Its venom contains a very potent neurotoxin which can lead to death within 6 hours after the bite.

22…Malayan Krait


The Malayan krait inhabits Thailand and much of Southeast Asia. They tend to shy away from the sun and are very active at night. Their venom is highly poisonous and death can result as soon as 12-24 hours after bite. Sadly, even after treatment, 50% of its victims will succumb to effects of the poison, dying usually from respiration failure.

23…Many-Banded Krait


Also known as the Taiwanese or Chinese Krait, the many-banded krait is a highly venomous snake found in southern China and Southeast Asia. In the daytime, this snakes hides in places such as holes and under rocks. However, at night, it hunts and becomes more aggressive. Symptoms will not appear promptly after bite, but may show hours later. If untreated, death is likely 70-100% of the time.

24…Terciopelo Viper


The terciopelo viper is one of the most dangerous snakes in the neotropical rainforest in Central America. They can grow up to 2.5 meters (8 feet) long and have heads that are 10 centimeters (4 inches) wide. They are responsible for the majority of snakebites in Central America. Their venom contains hemotoxins and if not treated with an antivenin can lead to death.

25…Common Krait

A member of the “big four” species in India, the common krait, is also known as the blue krait. The common krait feeds on other snakes and small mammals. Although reluctant to bite people, if it does, it will clasp and hold for awhile in order to inject a large amount of venom. The venom consists of mostly powerful neurotoxins leading to muscle paralysis.

26…Russell’s Viper


Russell’s viper is found in the Indian subcontinent and southeast Asia. Like the Indian Cobra it is considered on of the “big four” species. Russell’s viper can grow up to 166 centimeters (5.5 feet) in length. The snake is often times found in high urbanized areas due to the attraction of rodents. Therefore, those working in fields outside of cities are at a high risk of being bitten.

27…Indian Cobra


Made popular by snake charmers, the Indian cobra is found all over the Indian subcontinent. It is a member of the “big four” species, the 4 species that inflict the most snakebites on humans in India. However, as it’s admired in Indian culture, it is protected under the Indian Wildlife Protection Act. Its venom mainly consists of neuro and cardiotoxins. This means a bite can lead to paralysis of the muscles or even cardiac arrest. Symptoms can show anywhere between 15 minutes to 2 hours after the bite.

28…African Puff Adder


The puff adder is found in African savannah and grasslands, and is the most commonly found snake on the continent. Due to its commonality, it is responsible for causing the most snakebite fatalities in Africa. If they feel threatened or disturbed, they will adopt a tight coiled posture and the fore part of their body will form an “S” shape. They are very aggressive and strike very fast.

29…Philippine Cobra


If you see a Philippine Cobra, you better run away. These cobras are highly venomous and are capable of accurately spitting their venom at a target up to 3 meters (9.8 feet) away. The Philippine cobra is normally found in forested areas, along open fields. They are also fond of water, and therefore, can be found many times close to ponds and rivers. Small rodents are the preferred prey of their choice

30…Western Diamondback Rattlesnake


The western diamondback rattlesnake inhabits the southwestern area of the United States. It has been reported that it is most likely responsible for the majority of snakebite fatalities in northern Mexico and the largest number of snakebites in the U.S. The western diamondback rattlesnake has very large venom glands and special fangs so it can deliver a large amount of venom to its victims. However, as it normally preys on small mammals, it will only bite a human if provoked.

31…Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake


According to National Geographic “The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest venomous snake in North America. Some reach 8 feet (2.4 meters) in length and weigh up to 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms).” Despite what people think the eastern diamondback rattlesnake will not attack humans unless it feels threatened. Bites normally happen when a person is taunting or trying to capture the snake. The last warning before a bite is when the snake violently shakes its tail. Bites can result in red blood cells deterioration, tissue damage, and if left untreated, death.

32…Common Lacehead


The common lacehead, also known as the bothrops atrox, inhabits the tropical lowlands of nothern South America. The species of pit-viper is easily agitated and is generally nocturnal. However, when necessary it may forage through the day, climbing trees and even swimming. It is often times found in coffee and banana plantations searching for rodents. Therefore, due to their camouflage, workers do not see the snakes and are often bitten. The venom is very lethal and fast acting. Even when received treatment, almost all cases lead to temporary of sometimes permanent memory loss.

33…Eastern Brown Snake


The eastern brown snake is mainly found along the east coast of Australia. The snake is considered to be the second-most venomous terrestrial snake. Its venom has both neurotoxins and blood coagulants. A bite from the eastern brown snake can cause dizziness, renal failure, paralysis and cardiac arrest. Although it normally only eats rodents, like mice, if it feels threatened, it will bite a human. It is responsible for 60% of snake bite deaths in Australia.

34…Inland Taipan

The Inland Taipan is the most venomous of all the snakes in the world. What also separates this snakes from many others is its prey. The snake is an expert in hunting mammals, therefore, its venom is adapted to kill warm-blooded species. It normally does not strike unless provoked. Its venom contains neurotoxins which affect the nervous system, hemotoxins which affect the blood, and myotoxins which affect the the muscles. If untreated the venom can be lethal.

35…Tiger Snake


Tiger Snakes are found in the southern regions of Australia and some of its coastal islands. It gets in name from its color, as it is often banded like a tiger. A tiger snake’s venom contains many potent toxins. Once bitten a person will experience, at first, localized pain followed by breathing difficulties and finally paralysis. Studies show that untreated bites have a mortality rate of 40-60%.

36…Boomslang

The sub-Saharan African Boomslang, may look cool. However, do not touch! The average adult boomslang is 100–160 cm (3¼–5¼ feet) in length, with extremely large eyes. The boomslang has a highly potent venom that it can deliver through fangs at the back of its jaw. The snake is able to open its jaws 170° when biting. The venom is mainly made of a hemotoxin which disables the coagulation process in a person’s body. Signs and symptoms of a bite may not show until hours after.

39…Black Mamba


The Black Mamba is found in the savannas and rocky areas in southern and eastern Africa. It can grow up to 14 feet long and can slither up to 12.5 mph, making it the fastest snake in all the planet. Although it only attacks when it is provoked, when it does attack beware. The Black Mamba will bite several times, delivering enough toxins to kill 10 people. There is a antivenin but it must be received within 20 minutes.

40…Saw-Scaled Viper


The Saw-Scaled Viper kills more people than any other snake each year. Although it only grows to 1-3 feet long, its venomous bite can do lots of damage. Their venom contains hemotoxins and cytotoxins, which leads to multiple bleeding disorders including the possibility of an intracranial hemorrhage. Many of these snakes are found in areas where modern medicine is not found. Therefore, victims sometimes suffer a long, painful death.

41…King Cobra

The King Cobra is the world’s longest venomous snake. It is predominantly found in India and other parts of Southeast Asia. The King Cobra’s venom’s toxins attack the victim’s central nervous system resulting in pain, vertigo and eventually paralysis. It has been reported that death can occur as short as 30 minutes without the antivenin. The toxin is so deadly, it could even kill a large elephant.

Henry Sapiecha

 

 

DEADLY TAIPAN VENOMOUS SNAKE KILLS SNAKE HANDLER IN 50 MINUTES IN ROCKHAMPTON QLD AUSTRALIA

Snake handler dies in 50 minutes after being bitten by  Taipan snake in Australia one of the most deadliest venomous snakes in the world

Wayne Cameron working for his own business, Reptrix Reptile-image www.pythonjungle.com

Wayne Cameron working for his own business, Reptrix Reptile

Snake catcher above did own first aid after bite, died 50mins later

 

SOME 10 COMMON & SOME DEADLY AUSTRALIAN SNAKES-Many more to come

1. Coastal Carpet python

Coastal Carpet python-image www.pythonjungle.com

Danger: Non-venomous. Bites may cause substantial lacerations or punctures.

Description: Large, heavy bodied snake with a highly variable, mottled and blocked pattern and colour. Mostly white to cream on the underside.

Average size: 2.3m long but large specimens can exceed 3m. Largest reliable record is 4.2m.

General: Most commonly encountered snake in the region. Often lives in ceilings. Active day and night. Large specimens can devour small pets such as dogs, cats and chickens, with smaller specimens taking caged birds.

Diet: Mostly mammals such as rodents, possums, bats, etc; also some reptiles, birds and frogs.

2. Spotted python

spotted python australia image www.pythonjungle.com

Danger: Non-venomous. Bites may cause minor lacerations or punctures.

Description: Solidly-built snake but not as large as the Coastal Carpet python. Fawn or pale-brown ground colour with contrasting dark, chocolatey-brown mottled and blotched pattern and colour. Mostly cream on the underside.

Average size: 75cm-1m. Large specimens may reach 1.5m.

General: Nocturnal. Preferred habitat includes rocky outcrops and associated ridges within dry forests and woodland. Will inhabit areas where ground timber is frequent. Mostly found in the Hinterland it is also infrequently found across the coast in and around mountain areas such as Mt Coolum, Buderim and the Glasshouse Mountains.

Diet: Small mammals, birds and lizards.

3. Common tree snake

Common tree snake.image www.pythonjungle.com

Common names: Green tree snake, yellow-belied black snake, grass snake. 

Danger: Non-venomous and bites infrequently. Emits strong odour if threatened.

Description: Sleek slender body with long, thin tail. Colour ranges from green, olive, yellow, brown and black to rare blue-grey on upper body. Belly yellow or creamy, with bright yellow on throat. Some specimens with blue or grey belly. Large eyes.

Average size: 1.2m long and up to 2m.

General: Active by day. The most common species to enter homes on the Sunshine Coast. Fast-moving and hard to see in heavy cover.

Diet: Frogs and skinks but will also take small fish.

4. Keelback

Keelback-snake-image www.pythonjungle.com

Common names: Freshwater snake, Water snake, Swamp tiger.

Danger: Non-venomous. Reluctant to bite. Gererally strikes with mouth closed. Emits strong odour when threatened.

Description: Variable colouring but typically shades of grey, brown or olive with irregular, broken cross-bands or flecks of darker brown and flecks of paler creamy colour. Belly surfaces cream or pale rusty colour with dark scale edges. Feature is each scale has a distinct raised longitudinal ridge, giving the snake an appearance of parallel ridges down the length of the body.

Average size: 60cm but can reach 90cm.

General: Active by day and night. Often encountered in suburban homes and yards throughout moist suburbs or areas where creeks and drainage lie.

Diet: Frogs, lizards and occasionally fish and tadpoles. often noted for its ability to eat cane toads.

5. Brown Tree snake

Brown Tree snake-image www.pythonjungle.com

Common names: Night tiger, Eastern brown tree snake.

Danger: Mildly venomous. Bites and causes localised pain and swelling and possibly headaches and nausea. Most experts regard it as a minimal risk to all but young children.

Description: Slender-bodied with bulbous head and narrow neck. Large eyes with vertical pupils. Upper brown to reddish-brown or even dark orange, with irregular indistinct darker cross-bands. Belly creamy, apricot or orange.

Average size: 1.2m up to 2m.

General: Strictly nocturnal. Skilled climber often found in the heavy foliage of trees and shrubs and in roofs.

Diet: Birds, bird eggs, small mammals, frogs and reptiles.

6. Yellow-faced whip snake

Yellow-faced Whip snake-image www.pythonjungle.com

Common names: Whip snake, grass snake. 

Danger: Potentially dangerous, especially to children. Bite may cause pain and severe symptoms.

Description: Very slender snake with long, thin whip-like tail. Large prominent eyes. Colour generally pale olive or bluish-grey, often with rusty flush or longitudinal stripes along front-third of body. Belly grayish-green, often yellowish under tail. Distinctive face markings. Obvious pale cream or yellow rim around eye, with dark comma-shaped marking curving back below eye.

Average length: 65-70cm but can grow over 90cm.

General: Swift-moving, alert and with good vision; an active hunter by day or hot nights. Quick to retreat. Often seen in suburban yards in and around rock and timber retaining walls.

Diet: Small lizards, frogs and lizard eggs.

7. Lesser black whip snake

Lesser Black Whip snake.image www.pythonjungle.com

Danger: Larger specimens can be potentially dangerous, especially to children. Bite may cause localised pain.

Description: Large prominent eyes. Colour rich dark brown through reddish brown to dark grey, often reddish-brown flush towards tail. Body has pattern of black and white flecks or spots caused by dark and light markings on individual scales. Top of head usually has dark brown spots and flecks, and narrow, pale edge around eye. Belly greenish-grey.

Average size: 1.2m

General: Swift-moving, alert and active by day. Very shy and infrequently encountered.

Diet: Small lizards and frogs.

8. Eastern brown

Eastern brown-snake image www.pythonjungle.com

Common names: Common brown snake, brown snake.

Danger: Highly venomous. Accounts for more fatalities than any other Australian snake. A nervous, ready biter it will defend itself if threatened. The second most toxic land snake in the world.

Description: Highly variable in colour and pattern. Colour ranges from pale tan through orange, russet, dark brown and almost black, sometimes with cross-body banding. Belly unusually cream, yellow or orange.

Average size: 1.4m and up to 1.8m.

General: Active hunter by day but active on hot nights. Occasionally climbs in search of prey. Often encountered in and around localities with a strong rodent presence such as bird aviaries and stock feed sheds.

Diet: Primarily small mammals (rats, mice etc.) but also lizards and frogs

9. Red-bellied black

Red-bellied black-snake-image www.pythonjungle.com

Danger: Highly venomous. 

Description: Uniform glossy black along whole body. Belly has red or pink flush brighter on the sides and paler in the middle. Hind edge of belly scales is black, creating an even red and black striped appearance. Belly colour is visible along flanks and sides.

Average size: 1.5m and up to 2m.

General: Active by day but has been known to be active on hot nights. Favours wet habitats; rain forest and near water. Reclusive but will inflate and flatten the body and neck to intimidate an aggressor. Fearsome reputation is exaggerated.

Diet: Primarily frogs but also other reptiles (including other snakes) and small mammals.

10. Marsh snake

Marsh snake-image www.pythonjungle.com

Common names: Black-bellied swamp snake, Swamp snake.

Danger: Mildly venomous. Bites have been known to cause pain and swelling, possible headaches and nausea. Most authorities regard it as a minimal risk to all but children.

Description: Fairly uniform brown, olive or black above with dark grey or black belly surface. Two prominent narrow pale-yellowish stripes on each side of the face, one running from snout through eye and onto neck area, and one below eye running from snout to corner of mouth.

Average size: 50com up to 70cm.

General: Diurnal, although may also be active at night in hot weather. Shelters under rocks and debris. Uncommon throughout most of the region although common near Beerwah.

Diet: Small frogs and lizards.

ooo

Henry Sapiecha

Girl dies from an extremely deadly brown snake bite in Walgett, NSW Australia

Eastern_Brown_Snake_image www.pythonjungle.com

A girl killed by a brown snake in Far North NSW did not know she had been bitten until several hours later when she was almost comatose, the shire’s deputy mayor says.

The six-year-old girl died on Saturday after being bitten on a property outside Walgett on Friday, prompting emergency services to issue a state-wide warning.

She was taken to Walgett Hospital, where doctors administered anti-venom, about 3pm on Friday.

She was then flown to the Sydney Children’s Hospital in Randwick, where she was placed on life support.

After her condition deteriorated significantly, she was transferred back to Walgett Hospital, where she died.

Walgett Shire deputy mayor Jane Keir, a registered nurse for more than 40 years, said she believed the girl did not see the snake and did not know that she had been bitten until several hours later.

By the time her family took her to Walgett Hospital, it was a “pretty drastic case” and there was probably little that could have been done, she said.

“I believe the family didn’t know she’d been bitten and, by the time they’d realised, she was comatose,” Cr Keir said.

“The little girl could have been on the edge of Sydney and the result would have been the same.”

Cr Keir said she believed the girl trod on the snake while outside on her family’s property, about 25 kilometres from the Walgett township.

She was suffocating by the time she was admitted to hospital and the family wasn’t able to identify what snake bit her because no one saw it, Cr Keir said.

Eastern brown snakes cause more deaths than any other species of snake in Australia and victims often don’t realise they have been bitten.

The initial bite is generally painless and often difficult to detect, the Australian Museum says.

Many bites are caused by people trying to kill or move them or accidentally treading on inactive snakes that are sheltering beneath logs, rocks or man-made covers such as sheets of iron or building material.

The snakes react defensively and viciously if surprised or cornered. They typically have small fangs but extremely potent venom that can cause progressive paralysis and uncontrollable bleeding that can spread to the brain.

NSW Ambulance and NSW Police have issued a reminder to people to be wary of snakes in warmer months.

Tips from NSW Ambulance include:

• If you are bitten by a snake, ensure someone calls triple zero immediately.

• Until help arrives, if the bite is on a limb, apply a pressure immobilisation bandage but not so tight that it will cut off circulation.

• If the bite is not on a limb, apply direct and firm pressure to the bite site with your hands (it is also important the patient is kept still).

• Check items of clothing that have been left outside before wearing them and if you lift something such as a rock or log, lift the object so it’s facing away from you.

Numbers of eastern brown snakes have proliferated over the years due to large-scale land clearing, which provides a ready supply of rodents for the snakes to feed on, the Australian Museum says.

They are most commonly found in scrublands, rural areas that have been heavily modified for agriculture and on the suburban outskirts of large towns and cities across eastern Australia.

Joy Adams, general manager for the northern sector of the Western NSW Local Health District, said the health district and the Walgett Multipurpose Service extended their condolences to the girl’s family.

“We can confirm that appropriate treatment and care was provided, including the administration of anti-venom, and that the patient was transferred to [Randwick] by air ambulance and then returned to Walgett.”

Chief Inspector Tony Mureau, from Walgett police station, said fatal snake bites in the area were extremely rare.

Cr Keir said some staff at Walgett Hospital who treated the girl knew her family.

“It is very, very tough. This would have been devastating for the staff,” she said. “It’s a tragedy and something that would have been very, very difficult to avoid the end result.”

ANN

Henry Sapiecha